Plenty of Bounce-Back Candidates for 2017 Jets

When any team has any many things go wrong as the 2016 New York Jets did, sometimes you have to take a step back. Take a step back to re-evaluate a group of players to determine whether or not the performances turned in were due to lack of talent, or continuous errors due to negativity permeating the locker room as one blowout loss after another takes it’s toll.

There’s no denying how bad the Jets were last season, but several players didn’t come close to meeting individual expectations.  Which players stood out (or failed to stand out) who could rebound in 2017 as the Jets try to get the franchise turned around and heading in the right direction?  Let’s take a look.

DL Muhammad Wilkerson and Sheldon Richardson- Richardson and Wilkerson have to be put in the same category here due to the simple fact that no matter how you may feel about their respective 2016 season’s, the two defensive lineman are undeniably talented players who Jets fans would like to believe will see an uptick in production for very different reasons. For Wilkerson it’s about pride.  A highly productive local product who had the respect of the Jets fan base until his production slipped, and it was leaked to the media that commitment issues for Wilkerson weren’t uncommon, just unreported.  Richardson, meanwhile, has never shied away from the fact that money is what motivates him, and this is a season in which he’ll have a chance to test free agency and try to get owners lined up pay him, be it through free agency or a trade.

RB Matt Forte- Forte is clearly not a part of Gang Green’s long-term plans, but if the team is going to work on developing  a young quarterback, getting him involved in the passing game could go a long way in that process.  For reasons unknown to anyone outside of Florham Park, Chan Gailey made little to no effort to include Forte in the offense as a pass catcher last season.  If not Forte, the Jets have two other backs who can catch the ball out of the backfield in Bilal Powell and rookie Elijah McGuire.

CB Buster Skrine- Skrine signed with the Jets after spending time playing opposite Joe Hayden in Cleveland and had an up and down first year with the Jets.  Last season, however, it was all down.  Skrine was flagged for a multitude of penalties throughout the season as both a boundary and nickel cornerback.  He’ll be competing with the likes of Juston Burris and Darryl Roberts to win a starting spot again this season.  Unless he really turns things around, Skrine will likely be gone after this season.

Buster Skrine will be one of several Jets looking to bounce back in 2017.

WR Jalin Marshall- No, Marshall is not a proven commodity the way Richardson and Wilkerson are, and he drew the ire of Jets fans who grew tired of watching him fail as a punt returner while coming up small in the passing game.  That aside, fans had high hopes for the undrafted free agent out of Ohio State last pre-season and he still remains a favorite of head coach Todd Bowles who has been allowing Marshall to get plenty of reps as the team’s slot receiver despite the fact that he’s suspended for the first four games of the season.  Putting emotions aside, thinking back to how good Marshall looked early last year and the way the team is treating him, it could bring you to the conclusion that Bowles is still going to give the versatile Marshall every chance to succeed.

If you’re looking for updates on how each of the players are performing along with the rest of the team, be sure to follow JetNation.com on twitter for live updates from Florham Park.

Bowles May not Have to Look far to Find Ideal Offensive Coordinator

By Glenn Naughton

 

The Jets search for a new offensive coordinator is three weeks old and while only a handful of candidates have been leaked to the media (John Defilippo, Eric Studesville, John Morton and George Godsey), it’s fair to say that a member of Todd Bowles’ current staff could be exactly what the Jets are looking for to run their offense in current wide receivers coach Karl Dorrell.

A former wide receiver himself out of UCLA, Dorrell has almost 30 years of coaching experience between the NFL and several big-time college football programs in a variety of key roles.  From head coach at his alma mater where he posted a career record of 35-27, to go along with six seasons of offensive coordinator experience with stops at Colorado (1995-1998), Washington (1999), and Vanderbilt (2014).

Jets quarterback Christian Hackenberg would benefit from an experienced QB coach.

Bringing in an experienced play caller is crucial for the Jets, given the fact that the only two quarterbacks on the roster who will be under contract next season are Bryce Petty and Christian Hackenberg.  A coordinator who has worked with young quarterbacks on a day-to-day basis is a must for the Jets, and it’s another area in which Dorrell has extensive experience.  Dorrell has spent three seasons as a QB coach  with Miami in 2011 before spending 2012 and 2013 with the Houston Texans.

With the Dolphins, Dorrell’s stay was short-lived as head coach Tony Sparano and his staff were dismissed after the season, but the Dolphins did manage to get career journeyman Matt Moore to post a 6-6 record with 16 TD passes to just 9 interceptions with Dorrell as his QB coach.

In Houston, Dorrell worked with Matt Schaub during a 12-4 season in 2012 that saw Matt Schaub throw 22 TD’s and 12 interceptions with a 64% completion percentage.  The following season was a completely different story as the Texans fell to 2-14 while Schaub , Case Keenum and TJ Yates combined for just 19 touchdowns and 22 interceptions.

None of those performances will get Dorrell lumped in with the elite offensive coaches of today, but right now isn’t about today for Bowles

Bowles and Dorrell worked together with the Dolphins when Dorrell was the ‘Phins QB coach.

and the Jets.  In a way, it’s more about the past and future.  Dorrell has worked with quarterbacks and called plays in the past, and the work he’ll be doing will presumably be all about laying the groundwork for the future of the franchise at the quarterback position.

Another box Dorrell ticks with Gang Green is continuity.  No outside hire is going to have the first-hand knowledge of the Jets young quarterbacks that Dorrell has, and none will have been present for any meetings being held by the front office and coaching staff as the team has attended the East/West shrine game with the Senior Bowl up next.

Dorrell may help Todd Bowles save face publicly.  The coach has been shut  down by at least one candidate (Defilippo) with a picture being painted of a man without a plan. Bowles reportedly had a full season to plan on hiring Gailey’s replacement as the former coordinator informed Bowles of his pending departure before the season, but now three weeks later, he’s still looking.

Elevating Dorrell from within the organization allows Bowles to say Dorrell was the team’s top choice, or one of their top choices all along, but he felt the need to complete his due diligence.  Unlikely true, but not beyond the realm of possibility either.

Bowles was asked recently about the offensive coordinator search, and he simply answered “I’m pretty sure where I’m going.  I know what we need and how to slot them in”.

If he’s looking for play-calling experience, one-on-one QB experience and continuity for the players and staff, the only place Bowles should be going, is to Karl Dorrell’s office to make him an offer.

 

 

Bowles Interviews OC Candidate, Addresses Gailey Retirement

By Glenn Naughton

 

After nothing but radio silence from the New York Jets following the retirement of offensive coordinator Chan Gailey three weeks ago, New York Jets head coach Todd Bowles spoke with the media from Mobile, AL where he’s attending senior bowl week.

Bowles made some contradictory statements regarding the time Gailey spent with the Jets, while coming off as cool and calm as it relates to the team’s search for his replacement.

According to Darryl Slater of NJ advanced media, Bowles claimed he knew when he hired Gailey, that it was a position he was only going to fill for two seasons.

“I knew when I hired him he was doing two years,” Bowles said. “We talked about it. He wanted to do two years, and that was that.”

Later, however, Bowles contradicted himself according to Slater, saying Gailey “didn’t say [it was] a possibility when I hired him [that he’d leave after 2016], It was just definitive after the first year.”

Either way, Gailey is gone and Bowles is leading the search for his replacement.

After Bowles was snubbed by the Philadelphia Eagles in their effort to interview their quarterbacks coach, John DeFilippo, and an interview with Denver Broncos running backs coach Eric Studesville didn’t produce any results, it’s been mostly quiet on the coordinator front.

However, multiple outlets have reported that Bowles did in fact interview New Orleans Saints wide receivers coach John Morton who has never called plays at the pro level, but did so for three seasons at USC.

Texans offensive coordinator George Godsey is also said to be on the Jets’ radar, but there have been no reports of the team conducting or scheduling an interview as of yet.

When asked about how the search is progressing, Bowles simply said “I’m pretty sure where I’m going”.  Where exactly that is?  We’ll know soon enough.

 

 

DeFilippo Rumored to be Jets Target for OC Position

By Glenn Naughton

 

Now that Jets offensive coordinator Chan Gailey has retired, Gang Green will begin the task of finding their next play caller on offense, and one name already rumored is current Philadelphia Eagles quarterbacks coach, John DiFilippo.

According to Adam Caplan of ESPN, a Jets source mentioned DeFilippo as a possible target.

DeFilippo has one season as a coordinator under his belt when he held that position with the Cleveland Browns under Mike Pettine in 2015 when Cleveland had the league’s 30th ranked offense, putting up 17.4 points per game.

DeFilippo has also spent six years as a quarterbacks coach outside of this season with the Eagles.

During stints with the Jets and Raiders, DeFilippo has mentored the likes of Jamarcus Russell, Marques Tuiasosopo, Mark Sanchez, Matt Leinart, Terrelle Pryor, Matt McGloin and Derek Carr during his rookie campaign.

Jets Passing Offense Film Review – Week 15 (Dolphins) Petty’s Friends

We are combining the “Pity Petty” and “Petty Help” articles from here on out, so they will be seen together.  In this fashion, we can have a three day release schedule of “Petty Nation”, “Petty’s Friends”, and “Petty Crimes” without venturing too far into the excitement for the next game.  In this article, we’ll look at how his teammates performed this past week against the Dolphins.   This week will have an unusually high number of examples.  The example will have captions on them for the first time, showing the down and distance.

Pity Petty:

1)

1st & 10

 

The Dolphins are in a single high safety look at the onset of, with man coverage.  Once he executes the play action, Petty’s first read in Quincy Enunwa, who has beaten his defender, but there is a second linebacker in the area, and Petty pump fakes to him.  Petty’s second read is Anderson, but the throwing lane is blocked by the defender on Seferian-Jenkins, which would force Petty to lob the ball over the defender before Anderson’s defender can make a play.  Instead, Petty goes to his third receiver in Jenkins, and places the throw on his outside shoulder because there is a defender to the inside.  Jenkins just drops the pass.  Petty did everything well on this play, but Jenkins fails with the catch.  As we have seen with Petty, and other young QBs, the linebacker away from the man coverage over the middle is often missed, which leads to bad interceptions.  In this case, Petty sees the linebacker in time, and moves onto his other reads, which is encouraging.  Remember how in the past weeks, we pointed out that single high safety with press coverage meant that Petty would look for the deep outside route?  Well the Dolphins apparently caught on as well because that’s exactly what they are trying to bait Petty into here.  On the right side of the formation, Marshall is in press coverage, but the safety runs over to his side to defend a deep pass anticipating a go route.  On the left side of the formation, the defender on Anderson backs up late to create more space between him and the rookie, so he could defend a deep pass better.  Petty does a good job of not calling an audible for the deep pass here, which creates a situation where they should have picked up a few yards, if not more.

2)

3rd & 4

If this play looks familiar, it’s the exact same play by the Dolphins which caused Petty to get hurt, exact same play.  They have two linebackers in the middle showing blitz (who back out), with four wide defensive lineman.  This play is here because Brandon Shell makes a terrible play here.   He lets the outside defender get a free run at Petty, and goes to double team the defensive tackle.  The Dolphins show blitz, which confuses the young offensive line.  There has been some blame for Petty for not calling better protection, but Shell has to cover his man, instead of heading inside here.  Petty deserves some of the blame as well because he makes a bad read.  There is a quick pass set up for Eric Tomlinson to the right of the formation, and in the face of what looks like a blitz, Petty should have thrown the pass towards Tomlinson.  However, there is no reason for a defensive end to have a free run at the QB, so the biggest culprit here seems to be Shell.  It looks like Petty assumed there was going to be a blitz, which would have left the middle of the field open, so when the linebackers backed out, he was left without an option.  This is a combined failure on the team’s part, but Shell deserves some of the blame for this, along with Petty making a bad read.  The good thing about this is that, the Dolphins repeated the same exact play in the 4th quarter when Petty got hurt, and he quickly realized the play was to the outside, so that shows some in game progression, albeit it ended badly for him.

3)

1st & 10

The Dolphins are playing single high safety on this play expecting run, and they bite hard for the play fake.  Brandon Marshall has one on one coverage to the right side of the formation, as Petty rolls out of the pocket and throws a decent pass to Marshall.  The failure isn’t on Marshall here, but rather the referees.  How is this not pass interference?  The defender is all over Marshall before the pass gets anywhere near him, pushing him in the back while holding his left arm onto Marshall.  Marshall seems to suffer from Cam Newton syndrome because referees seem to ignore contact made against him by defenders because of his size.  The NBA had a case of this with Shaq, but it’s persistent with Marshall on a weekly basis.  On Petty’s part, it’s a good roll out and he places the ball where only Marshall can catch the pass.  This should have been a penalty, otherwise it’s most likely caught.   The only other interesting aspect of this throw is the design of the play, with Robby Anderson.  When Anderson goes in motion, the safety on the other side moves up expecting him to come over to the side, but Anderson reverses course, which leaves the safety near the line of scrimmage.  This reaction is a good bait by Gailey because he needs the safety to clear the area near Anderson.  However, the play doesn’t quite materialize like the Jets would have hoped.  The play is supposed to be a three tiered option with Marshall on the comeback route, Anderson on the crossing route, and Tomlinson on the short route.  We’ve seen it numerous times in the past from Gailey, as he liked tiered options on roll outs (I believe there are good examples in last year’s Colts game film) but Anderson is slowed down in traffic in the middle, and Tomlinson just doesn’t get open.  Petty’s only option is really Marshall so he makes a good read on the run, but the referees miss the penalty.

4)

1st & 5

The defense comes out in a single high safety look, and Petty audibles to a deep pass down the sideline.  This is the exact pass the Dolphins were expecting on the earlier play we highlighted.  In this case, Petty reads the defense right with the audible and has Marshall with an inside step.  However, it lands incomplete with plenty of blame to go around.  The first blame is on the Brian Winters because the Dolphins gifted the Jets a first down on this play.  Suh jumps into the neutral zone right across from Winters, but he doesn’t budge at all.  Considering the five yards would have gotten them another first down, it’s a bad play by Winters.  You will see veteran offensive lines across the league get penalties because they will jump up as if they saw a ghost anytime a defender even comes close to jumping off sides.  They get free yards in that sense, which the Jets rarely seem to do.  Besides getting free yards, the other incentive is to control the defensive ends from timing the snap because they know that if they even flinch to hard, the offensive lineman will act to draw a penalty.  If the offensive line doesn’t take advantage of this, the defense can try to guess the snap counts because they know they will get back before a penalty can be called.  Part of it can be chalked up to inexperience on the line, but a major factor is the lack of fundamentals on the team.  They rarely seem to do anything but the bare minimum, and refuse to take advantage of situations presented to them.   The second failure of this play is on Petty, because he throws this pass to the outside shoulder of Brandon Marshall when he had inside position.  Petty has to get better timing with Marshall because he is the team’s No. 1 receiver and this is just a bad throw.  This is a bad throw by Petty, one he needs to correct, because the right throw would be to the inside shoulder of Marshall.  The third culprit on this play is Marshall, who goes after this ball with one hands, and shows a lack of urgency.  There is blame to go around on this one, with the biggest being Bryce Petty.  However, an error by Winters and the lack of effort by Marshall causes it to end up here, although it could very well have been in “Petty Crimes” as well.  This is the drive where the Jets failed to convert the first down, after the run by Powell was reversed, so the possible penalty would have really helped.

5)

2nd & 10

The defense is in a two deep safety look in this two minute drill.  The Dolphins are in a zone coverage scheme here, and Petty makes a great read here.  The first thing Petty does on this play is hold the safety with his eyes, which is very advanced for his first few starts.  Petty has a two read play on this, with Marshall being the first one, and then a short pass to Powell with some open space.  Brandon Marshall finds a soft part in the zone, and Petty throws a great pass to him.  Unfortunately, Marshall just flat out drops the pass.  It looks like Marshall was thinking about running before he secured the pass, as he was looking to run towards the sideline.  Petty shows very good skills by holding the safety with his eyes, and makes a good throw but Marshall just drops the pass.

6)

1st & 10

The defense is in a two safety look with man coverage across the board.  Petty makes the correct pre-snap read because he sees Enunwa with a defender playing off with a seam route called, so Petty does a good job of recognizing the coverage and which player has the highest chance to be open.  This is another play where Petty holds the safety to the right of the formation by looking right at him, before he turns towards Enunwa.  He makes a good throw to Enunwa to his outside shoulder (mainly because there is a safety coming towards him from his inside shoulder) and replays showed that Enunwa just had this ball go through his hands.  It seemed as if the ball arrived faster than Enunwa expected, as it passed through before Enunwa could close his hands.  This is another great read by Petty, but a missed catch by Enunwa.  This is not an easy catch by any stretch, but with tight coverage on this play, Enunwa has to make this play, as Petty threw the pass where it needed to be placed.

7) 

1st & 10

The Dolphins are in a two tiered safety look here, with the Jets having two receivers, along with a TE on the line.  The Jets have seven guys on the offensive line on this play, the Dolphins end up sending four guys.  However, the defense gets pressure on Petty before he completes the play action, which is just an embarrassment.  The play is meant to go to Robby Anderson who gets wide open playing against zone coverage, but Petty can’t finish his play action before he’s hit.  As soon as he turns around for this pass, there is a guy in his face, and he does a good job of escaping his clutches, but makes a poor decision by throwing it to Powell well behind the line.  Petty should have moved up in the pocket and tried to hit Anderson, but Petty isn’t sure if he’s about to be hit and decides to throw the ball to Powell, who loses about seven yards on this play.  This is just a bad play by James Carpenter and Wesley Johnson, who let Earl Mitchell run right up the field and into Petty.

8)

2nd & 6

The Jets are getting blown out at this point, so they are trying to put together a team.  The Dolphins are in a two deep safety look, but Enunwa going in motion confuses the defense as there is a missing defender on Seferian-Jenkins.   Petty does a good job recognizing the deficiency with the defense, and looks over immediately at Jenkins, who has a linebacker coming to his inside.  Petty moves on quickly to an open Robby Anderson, who drops this pass.  This play shows good field awareness with Petty as he sees the defense is confused and tries to take advantage.  However, he moves on and sees Anderson open for the pass.  This should have been caught by Robbie as the ball hits him right in the arms.

9)

3rd & 6

 This is a borderline play, and very well could be in “Petty Crimes” because the Dolphins bait Petty with this throw.  The Dolphins show a single high safety look with press coverage on the right side, and they are banking on Petty going towards Marshall on this play.  The defender is playing off Marshall indicating they are fearing a deep route, so Petty assumes this is going to be a much easier pass.  Petty does a good job of holding the safety with his eyes, and then throws a laser to Marshall.  The Dolphins did everything to bait Petty into this throw, but he gets it past the defender and it hits Marshall in the hands, but he can’t catch the pass.  This is one of the biggest issues with Petty because he tends to get fooled by coverage every now and then, and the defenses are baiting him into some of these throws.  This is a pass that could have been caught by Marshall, so this is a dual blame post.  Great arm talent by Petty, but he took the bait from the Dolphins, and Marshall can’t catch it either.

Petty Help:

1)

3rd & 11

The defense is in a two deep safety look with defenders dropping back because there is eleven yards to the first down.  Petty looks deep on this play towards Anderson but throws the pass to Powell, who gets some help from the offensive line.  This is a good read by Petty because he has a quick read to the left of the formation if he has a deep route open, and then a screen pass set up for Powell.  However, the biggest contributor to this play is Bilal Powell, who makes a great move in the open field to gain 22 yards.  One of the benefits of having a good armed QB is the extra space for screen passes with the running backs, as Bilal Powell has been magnificent the last two games.

2)

2nd & 7

Another play, another great effort from Bilal Powell.  The Dolphins are again in a two deep safety look, and they are playing man coverage across the board.  Petty hits Powell with a good pass, who makes a great move on the defender to turn up field and gain 18 yards.  This was pretty much the play at the line of scrimmage, as Petty throws this pass to Powell quickly.  Once again, Powell is the one that makes this play.

3)

1st & 10

Maybe this section should just be renamed to Powell’s Prowess.  Once again, Bilal Powell stars in this play, as he takes a simple screen pass and runs up field for about eight yards.  The Jets run Anderson on a WR sweep, which helps to draw the linebackers to the inside, allowing for a little bit more room for Powell to run through.  However, the crux of this play is Powell running hard again and making the most of his opportunity.  Petty does a good job of hitting Powell, but this is a pass most QBs not named Hackenberg can throw in their sleep.

4)

3rd & 7

Guess who makes the play again?  The defense is lined up in a two deep safety look for this critical third down play, and Bryce Petty finds Bilal Powell for 6 and a half yards, although it was initially ruled a first down.  Petty does a great job of stepping up in the pocket and avoiding the pass rush, as well as finding a passing lane towards Powell.  Once again, Powell does the hard work to get the yards, and comes up short by half a yard.

5) 

3rd & 10

Once again, Bilal Powell to the rescue.  It’s a critical third down again, and the defense is in a two deep safety look.  The Jets have Enunwa clear out the right side of the formation, and Bryce Petty hits Powell with the short pass with ample room to run.  Powell makes a great move on the defender and turns up field for about 16 yards.  This is yet another great play by Powell.

Conclusion:

Bryce Petty got plenty of help from Bilal Powell in this game, as the RB took screen passes for long yardage.  Notice that most of those screen plays happen in two deep safety looks.  Defenses can’t allocate resources to the running game, the deep and intermediate passing game, and the screen pass game at the same time without risk of being exposed at some juncture.  It doesn’t mean that every two deep safety look is susceptible to the screen pass, but the chances of it working out increase with one less defender in the box.  Powell was excellent in this game, making open field moves, and fighting for more yardage.  On the other hand, Petty’s receivers let down the young QB at times, with the biggest culprit being Brandon Marshall.  It still seems as though Petty hasn’t quite developed the correct timing with Enunwa and Marshall.

Forum Questions:

A) Since Bowles actions seem to indicate Fitz/Forte was his best chance to win, how wrong do you think his line of thinking was?

B) Do you move on from Marshall or keep him?  Please explain either choice.

Thank you for reading this article, and please be sure to check out the other breakdowns in our Film Room.  Petty Crimes will be posted tomorrow.

 

Jets Passing Offense Film Review – Week 15 (Dolphins) Petty Nation

Bryce Petty and the Jets lost another game this past week, to the suddenly surging Dolphins in embarrassing fashion.  While Petty made mistakes, he wasn’t as bad as the score would indicate.  Let’s examine his good plays from this game:

Petty Nation:

1) 

This is a second and ten play in the first quarter, with the Dolphins showing a two deep safety look to start the play.  Once, Petty gets behind the center, the Dolphins show their hand with a blitz, and subsequent single high safety look.  Petty realizes this change, and calls for an audible, which is exactly the call he needs to make in this situation.  Once the Dolphins show single high safety, with a corner blitz, Petty knows he has a one on one match up with Robbie Anderson on a crossing route, and that is a battle the speedy receiver should win.  Notice the positioning of the safety on this play, because this helps Anderson in the long run.  The safety is positioned inside of Anderson, to prevent the short crossing route, as assumed hot route from Petty with the blitz being recognized.  However, the audible has called for a deep crossing route, so Anderson runs by the safety and then turns for the crossing route.  At this point, Anderson makes close to a ninety degree turn, while the defender is forced to make a turn in excess if a hundred and thirty degrees.  The extra turn radius helps out Anderson because it slows down the defender, allowing for separation.   Petty throws an absolute laser of a throw to Anderson, who runs it in for the TD.  The Dolphins are relying on the blitz getting to Petty before the longer routes have a time to develop, but the offensive line held up well for this play (not the case in other situations) and they paid for it.  For the last couple of games, we’ve harped about how Petty needs to see a last minute defensive change, and realize the consequences, and he does so marvelously on this example.  Prior to the defensive change, this route would not work because there would be a safety near Anderson, but once that safety moved, Petty correctly surmises that the middle of the field would be open.

2) 

This is great play recognition by Petty.  The situation is second and thirteen, with the Dolphins showing a two deep safety look.  The pre-snap movement indicates man coverage as the defender moves with Enunwa.  On most plays, this is a give away that it’s man coverage, because the defense has pre-set notions on which defenders they want to cover certain receivers.  However, the Dolphins are actually trying to trick the young QB, but he doesn’t fall for it.  Assuming man coverage, Petty’s first read is correct in Austin Seferain-Jenkins because his defender is lined up well inside of him.  Robby Anderson running the shallow crossing route should create a pick play on the defender playing Jenkins, allowing for an easy pass to the TE.  However, the Dolphins disguised their zone coverage with the looks of man coverage, and switch into it as the play develops.  Bryce Petty does a great job of standing in the pocket and reversing course, as he looks at Jenkins, Anderson, and then Marshall.  The read on this play is the middle linebacker, who is running back in the middle of the field.  If the LB breaks off towards Marshall, then the deep pass to Enunwa is open, and if he does not, then the pass to Marshall is open.  Petty throws a very nice pass to Marshall, who runs around a bit to get back to the same yard marker as to where he caught the ball initially.  This is an excellent example of going through progressions, and understanding the defense at it’s core.  Petty doesn’t panic in the pocket once his pre-snap read is proven to be false, and picks apart the defense.  It’s also a very good play design by Gailey because Powell is open for the quick pass as well in case Petty needs to check down in the face of a pass rusher.

3) 

This is a first and ten play in the first quarter with the Dolpins in a single high safety look.  This play also does not count because there was an illegal hands to the face penalty on Ben Ijalana, which negated this pass.  The Dolphins are in press man coverage across the board, and the second safety is coming into the box to play the run.  This pass shows excellent timing with Marshall, as the ball was perfectly placed in the correct time (I believe even the broadcast booth mentioned it) as it almost functions as a back shoulder pass.  It’s a comeback route, and Petty throws this pass before Marshall even makes his cut.  If there is anything Petty can learn from Fitzpatrick, it’s these types of throws where he has to anticipate his receiver getting open.  Fitzpatrick’s biggest strength (and partial weakness) is his ability to anticipate throwing lanes, which he was forced to do because of his lack of arm strength.  Petty does not have this problem, but it’s an extremely useful weapon to be able to make these types of throws against press man coverage.  He should also learn with back shoulder throws as well, as he develops more timing with his receivers.  The only other thing to note on this play is the second safety.  Notice the hesitation of the safety when Petty does a little play action fake while he’s backing up, which opens up the passing lane further for Marshall.  The play action made sure the safety couldn’t jump the passing lane to Marshall, and played a sizable part in the success of this play.  Although, the penalty negates this play, it is here because it shows good anticipation from Petty (throwing a receiver open) and timing with Marshall.

4) 

This is a second and two play in the second quarter, with the Dolphins showing a single high safety in press man coverage.  Remember the play from earlier where the defender moved with the man in motion, and then they went into zone coverage.  Well in this case, they remain with the man coverage.  This is a great read by Petty because the Dolphins are playing press coverage, and he only has three receivers, with one of them being a TE.  Notice the position of the defender after Enunwa runs in motion, he’s about a yard or so outside of him because he has no protection to that side.  He knows there is a linebacker in the middle to protect him to the inside.  Petty does a couple of good things on this play.  The first is that, his first look is towards Marshall (as we have seen from the last few reviews- single high safety in press coverage- means take a deep shot in most college spread systems) but realizes that he’s well covered.  The look towards Marshall also sends the safety towards the receiver as well.  Petty goes through his progression and gets to Enunwa streaking across the field, and hits him in stride, which allows him to keep his momentum going forward, and then break off a big run.  Enunwa almost runs for the TD, but gets tackled by his shoelaces as he’s sprinting towards the end zone.  Remember the look Petty gave towards Marshall on this play, and how it moved the safety?  That would have been important because if the middle linebacker decides to stick to Enunwa and his route, Austin Seferian-Jenkins would be open for the pass.  The safety moving would have put him at a bad angle to make a play on the ball.  While it doesn’t have an effect on this play because the linebacker doesn’t go for Enunwa, it’s a small detail that can go a long way in Petty’s future.  The other thing to note on this play is the blitz pickup by Matt Forte on this play, as he gets pounded for stepping in front of the defender, but does his job.

5) 

This is a first and twenty play late in the second quarter, as the Jets embark on a rare two minute drive.  The Dolphins are in a two deep safety look and playing well off the ball in the middle of the field, while playing press coverage on the outside.  Petty realizes that the middle of the field is probably the spot to find an open receiver, and he finds Charone Peake in the middle for a ten yard gain.  This is just a good pre-snap read by Petty, and also not rushing throws in a two minute offense.  The defense was willing to concede the middle of the field on this throwing, trying to bait the young QB into throwing a bad pass in an attempt to convert the twenty yards all at once.  Petty shows good poise and takes what was given to him.  The throw isn’t anything special, standard throw that any college QB should be able to make.  It’s just a good read by Petty at the line, and not getting too greedy.   It’s a good thing that Petty seems to be targeting Peake, because he is another young receiver the Jets should be excited about.  Peake had his second highest target total of the season in this game.  Look for Peake to get more targets as the season moves into the final phase.

6) 

This is a third and ten play in the second quarter, and the Dolphins are showing a two deep safety look with man coverage.  The Dolphins are banking on this pass going to Quincy Enunwa because they commit a safety over the top towards him (he moves up prior to the snap) as well as linebacker on the other side of the field dropping back into coverage.  However, Petty is locked into Robby Anderson on this play from the start.  It’s actually a good recognition by Petty because this is a single high safety look, with Anderson’s defender playing back.  This usually indicates that the defender doesn’t have help over the top, therefore is willing to give up some space with the intention of protecting the deep pass.  Anderson runs an absolutely wonderful route here to get open.  Notice that Anderson runs past the first down marker without any signs of slowing down, which immediately causes the defender to turn his hips and run down the field.  Anderson, then does a quick turn and is wide open for the comeback route, and Petty makes an excellent throw.  Petty has one more read on this play, which is the defender on Charone Peake.  If the defender wanders towards Anderson, then the play is to Peake going down the middle, before the safety comes into play.  However, the defender on Peake goes with the receiver, opening up the pass for Anderson.  Last week, Anderson made a mistake by not going out of bounds in a two minute drill, costing the team precious time on the clock.  Apparently, coaches had a talk with him, because he doesn’t even try to make a move on this play, and goes right for the sidelines.  This is a clutch throw by Petty from the far hash marks to the other side of the field.  One of the reasons the Dolphins are playing away from Anderson on this play is because a comeback or out route in this case is a tough throw due to the distance.  For example, Fitzpatrick would have to make this decision quicker, which may cause the defender on Peake to jump the route.

7) 

This is the very next play, first and ten with the Dolphins showing a two deep safety look.  Petty makes the wrong read on this pass, but his arm makes up for it.  The pre-snap read should have indicated that the left side of the formation had a much better chance of being open with defenders playing off.  However, Petty makes the wrong read by focusing in on Enunwa on this play because Petty wants a sideline throw to conserve time.  The Dolphins show a defender lined up about eight yards off, and slanting to the outside, as well as linebacker near Enunwa.  This should have been the ultimate sign to move away from Enunwa, but Petty does not heed.  The other side of the field is definitely open, and would have been a much better option.  However, Petty makes an amazing throw with this pass to the receiver.  The Dolphins had this play defended perfectly and they still got beat.  It’s an extremely risky throw because it’s double coverage (triple if you factor in the sidelines) with very little space to fit in a throw, but Petty makes the play.  There has been some labels of a gunslinger about Petty and this is a good example.  He has a great arm and he shows it off here but takes a risk that he did not need to take.

8) 

This is a second and ten play with the Dolphins showing two deep safety, and there is about 30 seconds left on the clock.  The Dolphins are conceding the middle of the field on this one, as you see both outside receivers double covered.  In fact, it’s the same coverage given to Enunwa on the last play, as they hope Petty tries his luck again.  Petty instead makes a good read and realizes that the middle of the field is open and takes the pass to Charone Peake again.  There is a deeper route developing behind Peake with Enunwa, but Petty doesn’t risk it being this close to field goal range.

9) 

This is a second and nineteen situation, with the Dolphins playing a two deep safety look.  They are playing a deep zone coverage, mainly because of the down and distance, and Petty doesn’t fall into the trap.  Petty’s initial read is Austin Seferian-Jenkins on this play if they are playing man coverage.  However, it becomes clear that they are in zone coverage, so Petty moves onto the cutting Enunwa to pick up yards and make the third down more reasonable.  Enunwa does a great job of fighting for yards and moving up field on this run after the catch.  This play can almost qualify for the “Petty Friends” article because Enunwa does great work here after the catch.  It is here mainly because Petty recognizes coverage on this play and goes to his secondary read instead of trying to push it.

10) 

The most famous play of the night, one that will live in infamy in future parodies about the Jets on national TV broadcasts.  This is a third and five play to start the fourth quarter, and the Dolphins are showing a single high safety look.  Single high safety look with press man coverage almost always indicates that the Jets are going for the deep pass on the outside.  Petty makes a beautiful outside shoulder pass to Anderson, who makes a great play on this ball as well.  This pass is extremely hard to defend because of Petty’s propensity to take deep shots with Anderson.   The defender doesn’t have help over the top, so his hips are turned to run up the field, taking him out of position to make a play on the ball.  This is one pass that Petty needs to learn from Fitzpatrick because it could be a huge weapon for him.  Under pressure, this is absolutely a great throw by Petty, and catch by Anderson.

Who do you blame on this play? Ben Ijalana, Wesley Johnson and Eric Tomlinson.  The reason this play turns horrible is because Petty changes the snap count, and calls for a quick snap.  Why?  He caught the Dolphins in a mistake, and wanted to take advantage.  The Dolphins are switching safeties, with one safety running back, while the other safety doesn’t correlate.  This means that two safeties are in the same area, rending one of them useless.  Also, the safety is coming from Petty’s left side, while the safety to move is on Petty’s right side, which is also Anderson’s side.  Petty doesn’t want the Dolphins to set up in a two deep wide safety look, because then he has to call an audible late in the play clock.  Petty rushes the snap count (whatever magic word calls for the snap in the shotgun) which throws off everyone else on the line of scrimmage.  This is a direct manifestation of the lack of experience on this offensive line, because they just haven’t played with the QB often enough.  Petty was injured for a large chunk of the season, which meant that he didn’t practice with the team, further diminishing his familiarity with the line, and vice versa.   QBs calling for quick snaps is prevalent around the league, so much so, that good QBs like Brady will fake a quick snap count to try and bait the defense to show their hands.  It’s deplorable that the line didn’t block well enough on this play and Petty got injured.  The biggest culprit is Eric Tomlinson, who doesn’t block anyone on this play and looks dumbfounded that the ball is snapped.  The other culprit is actually the entire offensive line, because they failed to slide their protection.  All of them had to block the defender to their left (except Tomlinson) and this would have been a fine play.  However, the LT lets the outside defensive end go, instead choosing the block the inside defender, and the guard follows suit.  The center, Wesley Johnson doesn’t slide back because the Dolphins backed out of a blitz, so he stood there protecting thin air.  James Carpenter froze on the play as well, but his man had nothing to do with this play, especially since Ben Ijalana decided to block him instead of the outside defender.  This is just a horrible play from Ijalana, because at least Tomlinson isn’t really a blocker and more of a receiver.

Conclusion:

Petty played well in this game, and started off extremely well.  He does get a lot of help from Powell in this game (as you will see in the Petty’s Friends” article) but there are also some glaring mishaps from his receivers, especially Brandon Marshall.  Petty showed good signs in reading the defense, and he seemed to improve a bit in reading defenses while the play was in motion.  As usual, he did a good job of going through his progressions, especially noteworthy when facing such a ferocious pass rush with a makeshift offensive line.  It’s a shame he got injured in this game, because he did so while making a very good pre-snap read.  It’ll be exciting to see Petty face the Patriots next week, as they will try to give him disguised formations to throw him off.  It’ll be a good barometer on how far Petty’s play recognition has progressed.

Forum Questions:

A)  Who do you blame for the sack?

B)  Which was your favorite Petty throw?

Article Schedule:  Due to time conflicts, the Petty’s Friends article will be posted tomorrow, and the Petty Crimes one the following day.  

For people not enrolled in rehab programs:  A Fitzpatrick film breakdown article will be posted later today at 6 pm EST.  

 

 

Jets Passing Offense Film Review – Week 14 (49ers) Petty Crimes

While Bryce Petty showed a lot of good qualities in the game against the 49ers, he was far from perfect.  He had some terrible throws and decisions as well.  Let’s look at the bad plays from this past Sunday:

Petty Crimes:

1) 

The very first pass from Petty, and it goes for an interception.  This is a second and eight play in the first quarter, and the defense is in a two safety look.  However, they are in a peculiar look because the safety to the right of the formation is very close to the sideline, which was a reason for Petty to be weary of this pass.  The pass itself is a quick read pass, and in almost all instances is the correct read.  The defender is playing off from Enunwa, and when Petty looks over to his side, he’s actually taking a step or two backwards.  The Jets wanted to start of this game with an easy throw for Petty, but it turns out to be horrible because the defender makes a great play on this ball.  In baseball, a base good base runner goes on the first move from the pitcher in an attempt to steal the base.  It’s the same concept here because the defender is running towards Enunwa, even before Petty has loaded his arm to throw this pass.  This is a preset pass, there is no progressive read on this play because it’s all based on the pre-snap read.  Petty gets the ball, turns, and throws the pass but the defense was baiting it the entire way.  The reason for the safety to be shading over to the sidelines was to protect against the pump fake go route from Enunwa.  Retrospectively, Petty should have held onto the ball and thrown to an open Austin Seferian-Jenkins but this is just a great play design by the defense.  They baited a young QB, and assumed correctly that the Jets would go with a safer throw to start out the game.  If you notice, the defense is playing the same kind of coverage on the other side of the formation with Robby Anderson.  The safety is more towards the middle, but at the snap races towards the sidelines, because if Petty looks over to that side, the defender is going to jump the lane on a short pass.  They went all out on guessing the Jets would start with a short throw to the receivers.  It’s a bad interception, but this is not the works of a bad read or even a bad throw, but the result of a great play design by the defense and bad pre-snap reads.  However, Petty is the one that made this read, so he’s at fault.  He has to learn in the future about reading defenses, especially if a safety is hovering out of place.

2) 

This is a third and four play in the first quarter, and the defense has a two safety look, although one of them has moved towards the line, while playing zone coverage.  Petty makes a good initial read on this play, because the defender that bumps Charone Peake is Petty’s initial read.  If the defender slants towards Peake, then Anderson will be open for the quick pass.  If the defender doesn’t slant towards Peake, then the linebacker will be in the passing lane for Anderson, and Petty has to move to his second read.  Since the defender slants slightly towards Peake, Petty makes the correct read to Anderson on the out route.  However, this is just a bad throw from Petty as the throw goes off Anderson’s hands.  It looks like Anderson may have rounded off the route a bit, but this is a throw that Petty has to make in a critical third down situation.  The first down marker is at the 50 yard line, and it looks like Petty expected Anderson to cut right around the 50, when he actually makes his cut at the 52 yard line.  This is a play that should get better as the receivers and Petty get to know each other’s tendencies better, although it’s still a bad throw by Petty.  Unfortunately, Anderson is the most familiar with Petty so far into their young careers, so it does not bode well that they aren’t on the same page here.  A very good read by Petty, but an errant throw.

3) 

This is a bad play all around for the Jets.  This is another third and four play, and the defense is in a single high safety look.  On this one, Petty makes the wrong read because of late movement, which shows that he hasn’t grasped reading defenses at the NFL level fully yet.  This play starts off with Brandon Marshall on the right side of the formation, and three receivers on the left side.  Quincy Enunwa is motioned to the right side of the formation by Petty, right before the snap.  Usually, this type of move doesn’t leave the defense much time to adjust, but the 49ers are ready for it.  The idea for the Enunwa movement is to have Marshall or Enunwa matched one on one, with the deep safety too far away for the short pass.  However, the 49ers do a great job of switching at the last minute, with the safety coming down to pick up Enunwa, and the safety on the other end going deep.  The Jets tried to get a match up where one player was matched up against a deep safety, and it backfired.  As soon as the safeties switched, Petty should have looked towards the other side, where the Jets now got the match up they desired on the right side of the formation.  Charone Peake is open for the first down, but Petty is locked in towards the right side of the play.  To make matters worse, the offensive line lets a defender go through two blockers to hit Petty in the knees as he’s throwing this pass, which plays a part in this bad throw.  Although in the end, it doesn’t matter because Enunwa is well covered on this play.  Bryce Petty has to do a much better job at reading late movements with the defense, and understand the consequences of each defensive player’s movement in correlation to the routes that have been called.  The other negative aspect of this play is that he doesn’t move around in the pocket to find some space and buy time, which allows the defender to all but crawl to him.  This is a bad play all around for the Jets.

4) 

This is an atrocious play from Bryce Petty, because it’s a bad read along with a bad throw.  This is a second and six play, following a nine yard scramble by Petty.  The defense is press coverage with a two tiered safety look.  At the pre-snap, Petty sees press coverage on Brandon Marshall, along with a safety near by, which he most likely interprets as double coverage with the defender going deep and safety cutting off the passing lane.  Therefore, Petty’s first read is Anderson on this play, and he’s rewarded with an open Robby Anderson.  On the other hand, it seems like Petty is assuming that Anderson is going to stop his route, and air mails this throw over his head.  Anderson is about a yard or so ahead of his defender, and good pass may go for a TD here, but Petty just makes a terrible throw.  It looks like Anderson stumbled a bit with his release, but he’s still ahead of the defender, and Petty has to adjust this throw.  This might be a worse throw than the interception because Petty assumes Anderson would stop in his route, and then makes a terrible throw.

5) 

Another example of bad pre-snap reads.  The defense is showing an overload blitz from the left side of the formation with only one safety towards that side (the other safety is covering a receiver on the right side) on this third down and six play.  This is another example of the defense taking advantage of a young QB, because they expect him to go away from the blitz.  The 49ers bring the blitz, but also send their linebackers into coverage on the right side of the formation, cutting off the quick passing lane to Charone Peake.  Petty correctly presumes that Peake will get open on the one one one match up with his defender, but doesn’t account for the possibility of players dropping back into zone coverage.  Once Peake is covered, Petty is waiting for Anderson to run over the top, but gets sacked before he can pass the ball.  However, on the other side of the Quincy Enunwa is open for a pass, but Petty is too focused on the right side of the formation.  The defense fooled Petty again into thinking that Peake would be open for a pass, when it was much more complicated than that.  The defense technically only rushed five guys here, but since they overloaded the blitz, there was a free runner coming right at Petty.  Powell does a good job of picking up the first defender, but the second one comes through untouched.  This is a case where Petty has to move on from his first read as soon as he sees the defenders drop back, knowing that they are blitzing on this play, and look elsewhere.

6) 

This is a second and eight play late in the second quarter, and the defense is in a single high safety look playing press man coverage.  Remember from last week’s article about the Baylor read?  Similar situation here again.  Press coverage against players, single high safety in the middle, so attack the deep route down the sideline?  Petty goes for it again here.  At no point in his route is Robby Anderson open, but Petty decides to take a shot, and is lucky this ball isn’t intercepted because the defender has the inside position here.  The Jets employ late movement to catch opponents in bad coverage schemes, and they do it again in this case.  Brandon Marshall moves across the line right before the snap on this play, which forces the safeties to switch coverage.  The play didn’t work on the failed pass to Enunwa that we highlighted earlier in the article, but it works to perfection here.  Unfortunately, Petty ignores this aspect of the play and goes directly for Anderson.  Brandon Marshall is matched up with a safety playing off the line, and it would have been an easy conversion for the first down if Petty makes the correct read.  This is a terrible pre-snap read, terrible decision, and mediocre throw by Petty.

7) 

This is a first and goal at the eight yard line, in the third quarter.  The defense is playing man coverage, and they are essentially double teaming Brandon Marshall on this play.  On this play action pass, Petty correctly deems that Enunwa is the target with a one on one match up, but makes a bad throw.  This ball has to be throw towards the body of Enunwa, if not a back shoulder pass, but leading him was the worst throw Petty could make here because the defender is actually a step ahead of Enunwa.  There is a case to be made about how this could be a holding penalty on the defense, but it’s borderline.  In a one on one match, Petty has to make a better throw here and use the body of his receiver as a buffer from the defender.  This is the right read for the play, but a bad throw from Petty.

8) 

This is a second down and ten play, late in the third quarter.  The defense is in a two safety tiered look with press coverage across the board.  This is the drive Petty became obsessed with passing to Brandon Marshall, but misses the throw here.  This is a weird decision by Petty because he first looks at Quincy Enunwa, and he’s open for a big pass here, but passes it up for the short pass to Brandon Marshall.  It’s a bad throw as well, although it looks like Brandon Marshall hesitates on the route and Petty throws it ahead of him.  However, the biggest issue on this play is that Petty looks towards Enunwa and then decides to go to his second read, which was a terrible decision.  This is the type of play many fans criticize Ryan Fitzpatrick for because he chooses the safer option over the deep pass, but Petty has the arm strength to easily make this pass.  This is a major missed opportunity for Petty, who looks like he made a pre-snap read and didn’t change from it.  At the snap, with press coverage and only Enunwa running the deep route on the right side, Petty seems to have assumed that the deep safety will follow Enunwa in the middle.  Therefore, once the safety doesn’t commit to Marshall, Petty makes the throw to Brandon, which turns out to be a mistake.  The biggest error on the play is the missed opportunity to Enunwa, with the horrible throw to Marshall being the cherry on top.

9) 

This is a first and ten play in the fourth quarter, and the defense is in a single high safety look, as the second safety is playing Eric Tomlinson.  The Jets send the young TE in motion, at which the safety immediately signals for a coverage change with the other safety, and then quickly reverts back to when Tomlinson returns to his original position.  This move indicates that this safety is tasked with coverage on the TE should he choose to run a route.  So, it boils down to a single high safety, press coverage, and a deep sideline route.  Have we seen this move before? Petty again takes the deep shot, but under throws Quincy Enunwa on this pass.  Enunwa has a step of his defender, but is on the outside position so it would take a perfect pass for this completion.  However, Petty doesn’t throw this pass quite far enough and Enunwa has to turn around and play defender to prevent the interception.  Petty seems to have issues with throwing to Enunwa and Marshall deep because his timing with them has been erratic.  This is something that will be fixed with more playing time, but right now they are not on the same page.  We have been calling for the Jets to take deep shots far more often this year, so Jets fans can’t complain about these shots since the situation is a one on one match up.  However, Petty has to make a better throw here, or lead his receiver a bit further down the field.

10) 

This is a third and twelve play in the final minute of the fourth quarter. The defense is in a two safety look, and Petty makes a horrible read.  To start, the defense is essentially double teaming Brandon Marshall on the right side of the formation.  To the left of the formation, the Jets have three receivers with only two defenders nearby.  Petty has seen the linebackers drop back all afternoon, so he incorrectly assumes the middle linebackers will drop back on this play and block Enunwa’s path.  However, both linebackers blitz, leaving Enunwa wide open for the pass with room to run.  Petty is reading the deep safety on this play (assuming the linebackers are dropping back) so as soon as the safety leaves the area with Anderson, Petty throws it up to his most trusted receiver.  This was just a horrible play all around, especially considering the situation, where any yardage would help Nick Folk.  The read should have been Enunwa, then Anderson because the deep route would have taken time to develop.  This is one of the biggest growing pains with young QBs because reading defenses in a two minute offense can be complicated.  The Jets called a very good play here, where they should have gotten yardage, but Petty missed the read.  The defense is expecting the Jets to run this ball to gain a few yards to set up Nick Folk, so Gailey caught them in a bad coverage scheme but Petty can’t make them pay.

Conclusion:

Bryce Petty had an up and down against the 49ers.  He made some wonderful reads and throws, as well as some befuddling reads accompanied by atrocious throws.  When most fans want to see a young QB, they expect someone to come in and set the world on fire, but in most cases, they have to go through the growing pains.  Petty shows an excellent arm, decent mobility, and excellent determination on film, so there is definitely hope for the Jets moving forward.  However, he has to do a better job at understanding defenses, because the 49ers were able to play mind games with him at times in this contest.  He also has to develop better timing with Enunwa and Marshall, considering they are the two leading receivers for the Jets in terms of importance.  Hopefully, the Jets throw Devin Smith and Jalin Marshall into the mix as well so they can form timing with their quarterback.  Overall, this was an OK game for Bryce Petty, as his biggest mistake wasn’t the interception, but rather the times where he misread the plays.  It will be interesting to see how the Dolphins approach this game, because the offensive line isn’t blocking very well right now, and they have a great defensive line.  They could either go blitz heavy or zone heavy similar to the 49ers, so Petty has to be prepared for both looks.

Grade: C+

Forum Questions:

A)  What do you think was Petty’s worst mistake from this game?

B)  If you are the Dolphins, and your season rides on this game, how do you game plan against the Jets and Petty?

Thank you for reading our weekly Film Review session for Week 13.  Please free to check out our articles from earlier this year in the Film Review Section.

Power Rankings: Jets Move Up After Overtime Win

Rankings All 32 Teams Based on Week 14, and Previous Performances:


 

  1. New England Patriots (11-2)
  2. Dallas Cowboys (11-2)
  3. Oakland Raiders (10-3)
  4. Kansas City Chiefs (10-3)
  5. Pittsburgh Steelers (8-5)
  6. Detroit Lions (9-4)
  7. New York Giants (9-4)
  8. Atlanta Falcons (8-5)
  9. Seattle Seahawks (8-4-1)
  10. Green Bay Packers (7-6)
  11. Denver Broncos (8-5)
  12. Tampa Bay Buccaneers (8-5)
  13. Washington Redskins (7-5-1)
  14. Miami Dolphins (8-5)
  15. Baltimore Ravens (7-6)
  16. Houston Texans (7-6)
  17. Tennessee Titans (7-6)
  18. Minnesota Vikings (7-6)
  19. Indianapolis Colts (6-7)
  20. Buffalo Bills (6-7)
  21. Cincinnati Bengals (5-7-1)
  22. Arizona Cardinals (5-7-1)
  23. Carolina Panthers (5-8)
  24. New Orleans Saints (5-8)
  25. Philadelphia Eagles (5-8)
  26. San Diego Chargers (5-8)
  27. Chicago Bears (3-10)
  28. New York Jets (4-9)
  29. Los Angeles Rams (4-9)
  30. Jacksonville Jaguars (2-11)
  31. San Francisco 49ers (1-12)
  32. Cleveland Browns (0-13)

#28 New York Jets (4-9): Sunday’s game started the worst way possible, with Bryce Petty throwing an interception on his first pass. It got worse from there, with the defense getting shredded by a 1-11 team. All that being said, Petty showed that he can keep a cool head in the face of adversity by leading the team to a comeback win. Bilal Powell also continued to show Chan Gailey that he should be getting more time on the field by taking the reigns once Matt Forte went down. Powell secured the walk off touchdown in overtime to win it for the Jets. With 179 total yards and two rushing touchdowns, Powell showed he’s just as much of a threat as Forte. With the youth movement underway, it would make sense to give Powell more carries once Forte is back. Powell is younger, and could become the feature back. It’s already been said that both Todd Bowles and Mike Maccagnan will be retained this offseason. In which case, the emphasis on youth players should be even greater to see what they have for next season. The Jets’ final three games are against division opponents. Aside from seeing what they have in younger players, the Jets will also be looking to play spoiler in the AFC East. The Miami Dolphins come to MetLife Stadium Saturday night.

Rankings Going into Previous Weeks:

Week 1: #10

Week 2: #13

Week 3: #9

Week 4: #17

Week 5: #21

Week 6: #27

Week 7: #30

Week 8: #28

Week 9: #26

Week 10: #28

Week 11: #29

Week 12: #28

Week 13: #28

Week 14: #30

 

Jets Passing Offense Film Review – Week 13 (Colts) Petty Crimes

While we have already looked at the good aspects from Petty’s game against the Colts, it wasn’t all roses for him last Monday.  These were the plays that he’s going to regret during walk through.  Let’s examine them:

Petty Crimes:

1) 

This is a second down play in the third quarter, and the Colts start out with a two deep safety look, but switch to a single high safety look before the snap.  This play right here is the Baylor Bryce Petty.  Baylor uses a dual system of spread and up tempo to score on opponents.  The system works by spreading out defenses horizontally, so they are weak vertically.  They also use an up tempo system to catch defenses in bad personnel.  So if a defense is in dime personnel against Baylor, they will run the ball consistently until the defense finds a way to stop them.  On most occasions, this means they will send a safety into the box to act as an extra defender.  Once, it’s a single high safety look with press coverage, more times than not, the QB tends to throw a deep pass, trusting the speed of his receiver more than the defender.  The single high safety over the top can’t cover the outside part of the field effectively, so a sideline pass is desired.  On this play, that’s the exact read made by Petty when he sees the single high safety with press coverage on the outside with Brandon Marshall.  However, unlike college, the corners in the NFL can run with receivers, and this ends up being a bad pass.  On the other side of the field, Robby Anderson has off coverage, in a single high safety look.  As the previous article mentioned, this would most likely indicate that the defender is willing to give up some yards so he can protect the deep route.  The pre-snap read should have gone away from Marshall on this play.  As if making the bad decision wasn’t enough, Petty makes a horrible throw that floats out of bounds.  This is Bryce Petty reverting back to his Baylor days, and one of the primary reasons why he needs to get in playing time so he can make real time reads and adjust to the NFL.

2) 

This is the very next play, a third down and ten play in the third quarter, and the defense is in a two deep safety look and playing press coverage.  Petty does everything right on this play, except for the throw.  For one, he sees that it’s press coverage against his receivers, so there are no easy passing options.  He knows the route combinations, so Anderson will have the best opportunity of the bunch because his route has a hitch to it.  Anderson has a hesitation point in his route, and that is Petty’s cue to decide which player to throw to because he has one single read on this play, which is the deep safety on that side of the field.  If the safety is running towards Anderson to cut him off over the top, then the underneath in route with Quincy Enunwa will be open.  If the safety hovers near Enunwa (as is the case) then the deep route over the top will be open.  Petty makes the correct read when the safety refuses to commit fully to Anderson, finding an open Anderson with two steps on his defender.  Everything was on point right until when Petty makes the throw, which is overthrown by about three yards.  This is a terrible miss for Petty and the Jets because Anderson is certainly open on this play, and the set up was great for a TD.  Petty has to do a better job with these deep passes, which may come with more game repetitions as he gets used to his receivers.

3) 

One deep safety, deep pass to outside receiver.  Sense a trend? The Colts are lined up in a two deep safety look, but one of them is moving up towards the box and it ends up being a single high safety look.  This is a bad play because Petty is making a deep pass here into the safety zone without actually factoring in the safety.  If this pass was up the sideline, then it’s more acceptable, but it’s towards the middle of the field.  Petty overthrows Anderson slightly, which is enough for the safety to make a great play on the ball and make the interception.  This was a case where Petty was much better off taking the check down option instead of trying the deep pass.  Notice that the defender is playing well off the line of scrimmage, so they are protecting against the deep pass to begin with, so it was a bad idea to throw this when the defense is protecting against it.  Petty has protection in the pocket, so he had more time to scan the field and find other options.  This is another bad read by Petty, considering the situation, and terrible throw again.

4) 

This is a second and one play in the fourth quarter, with the Colts again showing a double safety look, and then switching to a single high safety.  This is a pre-determined throw made before the snap, after reading the defense.  Short distance for the first down, and they are playing off coverage on Charone Peake.  It should be an easy throw for Petty, but what complicates things is the bad snap.  The snap is low and towards the left side of Bryce Petty, which causes his left leg to move forward, and doesn’t allow him time to correctly set his feet.  If this kind of quick pass failure looks familiar, it’s because Christian Hackenberg’s college career is riddled with these types of miscues.  It’s the result of his hip opening up too quickly, which causes the throw to be off target.  On this play, Petty doesn’t set his feet correctly because he has to adjust to the errant snap, which throws off the pass.  Since it’s a quick route, Petty can’t afford to reset himself.  So why is this play here if the cause of this bad pass can be attributed to an errant snap?  It’s because Petty misses a golden opportunity on the other side of the field to make a great play.  The Jets have three receivers to the left of the formation, the Colts have two defenders in the same area code.  The Jets have set up a quick screen pass in this direction, with two receivers that can act as blockers.  If they do their jobs, this is a huge play waiting to happen.  Petty has to do a better job recognizing these types of situations and taking advantage.  Once again, Gailey gets criticized for pass plays in short yardage situations, but he outfoxed the defense into a situation where the Jets were all but guaranteed a big play, only to have his QB not take advantage.

5) 

Single high safety, deep outside route?  Check and check.  The Colts go to a single high safety look, with press coverage on Robby Anderson.   The defense started with a two deep safety look, but Enunwa going in motion causes him to move into the box.  Bryce Petty does a great job recognizing the movement of the defense, and knowing Anderson would be open.  He does have other options open underneath, including a TE wide open down the middle and Enunwa open on the shallow crossing route.  However, Petty again reverts to the college system which tells him to take the deep shot first when presented.   This is a situation where Gailey is accused of ostracizing the TE position in the game plan, but we have another case of a wide open TE in the middle of the field.  Petty’s first read is Anderson, who he sees as wide open and he takes a shot.  Unfortunately, this is another horrible throw as he leads him too far.  It feels like Petty is trying to make the perfect throw as if he’s auditioning for the future, instead of taking safer throws.  Anderson has at least a couple of steps on his defender, so there was some room for an under-throw on this pass but Petty aimed to hit him in perfect stride and missed.   It’s a decent read by Petty, but another bad throw.

6) 

Another example of the Jets starting to use the TE position.  If you go back and look at the film review series over the past year and a half, there probably isn’t another game where the Jets tried to get the TE involved quite as much.  This is a simple play, that has been repeated from earlier in the game.  If you read the Petty Nation article, you will notice the inverse of this play from the third quarter.  The Jets have three receivers on the right side of the formation, with Jenkins as the TE, and a running back out of the backfield.  The read on this play is simple with the linebacker.  If the LB jumps the passing route to the TE, then the pass goes towards the RB.  If the LB stays back, the pass goes towards Jenkins.  Petty makes the correct read as the linebacker is hesitant to commit to Jenkins, so he shows a good ability to read the defense.  While it looks like Seferian-Jenkins has a decent shot at catching this pass, it’s not quite as close in replays as he can only get one hand on the ball.  This was another pass where Petty misfired on his timing by just a bit, preventing a completion.  It’s another example of him making the right read, but a bad throw.

7) 

Another case of right idea, bad execution.   On this play, the Colts moved their safeties up, while playing off coverage.  This again should indicate that the outside defenders are going to be protecting the deep route, allowing the comeback route to be open.  Petty correctly reads the defense and determines that Anderson will be open because by this point they have to respect his deep speed.  On cue, Anderson is open for the comeback route but Petty just makes a horrible throw.  It’s not clear if this is a miscommunication on the depth of this route because it looks like Petty expected him to make his cut about two yards before he did.  Notice that the TE is also open on this play if need be, but Petty sees a much better option in Anderson.  Everything is absolutely great, up until the throw which goes out of bounds.  It could very well be miscommunication between the QB and the receiver, but they missed a very good opportunity to gain some yards on this play.

8) 

This is the play that was forewarned in the Petty Nation article.  There were two example of where the exact same route run by Brandon Marshall was open in that article.  The Jets turn to that route on a critical fourth down play, but the Colts sniff it out and have it well covered.  The defense is in a two safety look, and in zone coverage.  When Petty drops back on this play, his read should have been the outside defender originally on Charone Peake.  In most instances, that defender will only drift back slightly to guard against the running back out of the backfield.  Unlike most cases, this is a fourth and eight play, where they are not worried about the short pass to the RB.  The defender drifts back further, which causes Marshall to be double covered on this play.  It doesn’t really matter because Petty makes a horrible throw, but the down and distance of this play acts against the Jets.  If you remember, the crossing route by Anderson was the exact same play they ran in a critical third down play earlier in the game.  The movement by Peake at the last minute, attacking the safety is the exact same motion by Anderson on his TD play, only in this case Peake stops and turns around for the pass.  Petty has to do a better job of reading the defender here and moving onto his second read in Peake, who had an opportunity for the first down.  This is a bad read, as well as a bad throw.

9) 

This is what happens when the defense doesn’t have to worry about a running game at all.  The Colts drop every single linebacker back into deep zone coverage on this play, and Petty makes a terrible throw.  At the onset of the play, he sees the Colts revert to a single high safety, with off coverage on Anderson.  In most cases, this is an easy completion as he will be open for the comeback route.  Petty, however, doesn’t make a good read here because his primary read on this zone defense was the inside defender playing against Charone Peake.  If the defender stays on Peake, then Anderson is open for the pass.  If the defender doesn’t stay on Peake, then Charone Peake is open for the pass.  Petty makes a Fitzpatrick-esque blunder here by locking into Robby Anderson from pre-snap readings because this look has worked all night.  Unfortunately, the defense baits him into this throw and it’s an easy interception.

Conclusion:

Chan Gailey doesn’t run a complicated system, it’s a fairly easy system to learn for QBs.  However, it’s very dependent on making key reads on any given play, usually one or two players that make or break the play for the defense.  More often than not, Petty made the correct read, but an errant throw.  This shows that he does have a grasp of the system, better than the main stream media would indicate.  However, he seems to have timing issues with his receivers, especially Robby Anderson.  Maybe Anderson is much faster without pads and that is the speed reference in Petty’s mind, but he needs to get adjusted to his teammates.  Overall, it was an OK game for Petty, but he should improve as the season goes on.  If Petty can cut down on the bad throws, he could really help the Jets because he has shown to be much more advanced at reading the defense than fans expected.

Grade: C

Forum Questions:

A)  How would you rate Petty’s performance?  

B)  What is his biggest weakness?  

Please read, Petty Nation (Good Passes), Pity Petty (Let Down By Teammates), and Petty Help (Helped Out By Teammates) in our film review section to get a full review of his game.   

If you are an aspiring masochist, please check out Ryan Fitzpatrick’s performance in our Film Review section as well.  

Jets Passing Offense Film Review – Week 13 (Colts) Pity Petty

Bryce Petty had an up and down game against the Colts in the second half as he ushered in the end of the Ryan Fitzpatrick era.  However, there were some plays in which his receivers let him down.  Let’s examine these plays.

Pity Petty:

1) 

This is a second and twelve play in the third quarter on his first drive, and the Colts are playing zone coverage.   The Jets have three receivers, and two guys in the backfield to protect Petty on his first drive.  The defense is playing press coverage to the left of the formation, but they are backed up to the right side of the formation.  The pre-snap read should indicate that it’s far more likely that they will find an open receiver to the right side of the formation.  Prior to the snap, Robby Anderson goes in motion, and the Colts switch assignments at the last second.  Against zone coverage, this creates a match up problem for the Colts.  Petty should know the route combination prior to being at the line, so he should see that the outside defender is playing well outside of Quincy Enunwa, thus the inside corner is the one to read.  If he stays with Anderson instead of handing him off to the safety, then go towards Enunwa as he cuts across the field.  If he stays in the zone, then it’s Anderson running full speed against a deep safety.  Petty sees that Anderson has a free release, and makes a great throw to Anderson, who drops the pass.  It can be argued that it’s a tad under-thrown, but replays did show that Anderson did get both hands on the ball.  This is also a great angle of attack by the safety who covers the ground as Anderson tracks the ball to be there for contact when Anderson is trying to catch the ball.  This is a great read and throw by Petty, but unfortunately it’s a great reaction by the defender and a bad drop by Anderson.

2) 

This is a second and ten play in the fourth quarter, and again Robby Anderson makes a drop.  The Colts are in a two deep safety look, and playing off the line of scrimmage.  It’s Petty’s guess as to which side will be open on this play, and he actually does make a progressive read on this play.  The first read on the play appears to be Brandon Marshall, then the defender on Quincy Enunwa.  As you see with the play, Austin Seferian-Jenkins and Marshall get tangled up at the start of the play, which robs each player of their momentum, taking them out of the play.  Petty rightfully moves on, and hits Robby Anderson for the pass, which is dropped.  The read on this play for Petty is the defender on Enunwa since this is still zone coverage.  If the defender abandons Enunwa for the outside, then the pass has to go to Enunwa, since he would be open.  If the defender goes inside with Enunwa first, it creates room for a passing lane to Anderson.  The fact that Enunwa first runs an inside route isn’t by accident, it is to move the defender inside so there can be a throwing lane for Anderson in case the defender engages Enunwa.  The play set up by Chan Gailey here is excellent, and the play recognition by Petty is exquisite.   Unfortunately, Robby Anderson drops this pass, which is a shame because the play was executed perfectly on the right side of the formation.

3) 

There isn’t much to analyze with this third down play in the fourth quarter.  The Jets are essentially playing four down football, so Petty tries to throw the pass to Powell to gain some yards back, but the ball is dropped.  There are other options that could be open on the play, but this seemed like Petty picked an easy pass to gain some yard, but it didn’t go right.  Petty isn’t without fault on this play, because Charone Peake is open down the middle on this play, similar to Anderson in the first example in this article, but Petty goes for the quick pass.  It isn’t an ideal pass as the ball is to the left a bit too much for Powell, but he does get two hands on it, and it should have been caught.

Conclusion:

Bryce Petty made plenty of mistakes in the game against the Colts, but his receivers did make their share of mistakes as well.  Robby Anderson made his fair share of mistakes with two drops, but there should also be an adjustment period with a QB change.  Similar to how catchers have to learn to adjust catching from a soft tossing pitcher to a flame thrower, receivers have to get adjusted to the passes thrown by Fitzpatrick.  For the past season and a half, they have been accustomed to the passes from Fitzpatrick so they need time to adjust.  In the game started by Geno Smith, there were a high number of dropped passes as well early in the game.

Forum Questions:

A) Please provide a current player comparison for Robby Anderson

Please read, Petty Nation (Good Passes), Petty Help (Teammates Helping QB), and Petty Crimes (QB Mistakes) in our film review section to get a full review of his game.